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Table 1 Population data for the 28 most abundant waterbird species wintering at the Messolonghi lagoons during 1982 to 2012

From: Long-term population trends reveal increasing importance of a Mediterranean wetland complex (Messolonghi lagoons, Greece) for wintering waterbirds

Species name Biogeographic population (flyway/region) Messolonghi lagoons population
Name Estimate 1% threshold Assessment Mean ± SD Range Ramsare
Great crested grebe Black Sea, Mediterranean (w) 580,000 to 870,000 7,100 Decreasing 832 ± 749 47 to 3,205 0
Black-necked grebe Europe/S, W Europe and N Africa 159,000 to 268,000 2,100 Decreasing 567 ± 575 21 to 2,862 1
Little grebe Europe, NW Africa 300,000 to 510,000 3,900 Increasing 453 ± 347 62 to 1,113 0
Dalmatian pelican Black Sea, Mediterranean (w) 6,600 to 6,800 65 Increasing 65 ± 76 0 to 256 10f
Great cormorant Black Sea, Mediterranean 350,000 to 450,000 4,000 Increasing 2,913 ± 2,081 395 to 5,980 13f
Little egret Central, E Europe/Black Sea, E Mediterranean 44,000 to 72,400 560 Stable 356 ± 271 8 to 1,050 8f
Great egret W, Central, SE Europe/Black Sea, Mediterranean 38,800 to 54,300 460 Increasing 305 ± 218 7 to 927 7f
Grey heron Central, E Europea 189,000 to 256,000 2,200 Increasing 182 ± 140 5 to 500 0
Eurasian spoonbill Central, SE Europe/Mediterranean, tropical Africa 11,600 to 11,700 120 Decreasing 54 ± 56 6 to 219 3
Greater flamingo E Mediterranean 60,000 600 Stable 1,760 ± 2,417 1 to 8,360 13f
Common shelduck Black Sea, Mediterranean 120,000 1,200 Increasing 399 ± 458 42 to 2,270 3
Mallard E Europe/Black Sea, E Mediterranean 2,000,000 20,000 Decreasing 563 ± 634 5 to 2,500 0
Northern pintail W Siberia, NE, E Europe/S Europe, W Africa 750,000 7,500 Fluctuating 913 ± 799 30 to 2,500 0
Northern shoveler W Siberia, NE, E Europe/S Europe, W Africa 450,000 4,500 Increasing 2,070 ± 1,602 10 to 6,665 3
Eurasian wigeon W Siberia, NE Europe/Black Sea, Mediterranean 300,000 3,000 Stable 8,032 ± 3,303 2,563 to 15,600 30
Common teal W Siberia, NE Europe/Black Sea, Mediterranean 750,000 to 1,380,000 10,200 Increasing 5,048 ± 3,987 30 to 20,770 1
Common pochard Central, NE Europe/Black Sea, Mediterranean 800,000 8,000 Decreasing 4,574 ± 5,305 90 to 20,000 4
Tufted duck Central Europe/Black Sea, Mediterranean (w) 600,000 6,000 Decreasing 442 ± 1,002 0 to 4,000 0
Eurasian coot Black Sea, Mediterranean (w) 2,500,000 25,000 Increasing 20,884 ± 10,878 7,220 to 42,435 11f
Pied avocet SE Europe/Black Sea, Turkey (br) 47,000 470 Decreasing 625 ± 456 16 to 1,435 14f
Kentish plover Black Sea, E Mediterranean/E Sahel 32,000 to 49,000 400 Unknown 1,854 ± 1,436 31 to 5,150 22
Grey plover W Siberia, Canada/W Europe, W Africaa 250,000 2,500 Decreasing (?) 105 ± 64 2 to 205 0
Eurasian golden plover N Europe/W Europe, NW Africab 500,000 to 1,000,000 7,100 Increasing 1,357 ± 882 110 to 3,780 0
Northern lapwing W Asia/SW Asia, Europe, W Asia (br) 5,500,000 to 9,500,000 72,300 Stable 1,818 ± 1,537 120 to 6,940 0
Dunlin NE Europe, NW Siberia/W Europe, NW Africac 1,330,000 13,300 Stable 5,071 ± 2,923 720 to 10,800 0
Little stint N Europe/S Europe, N and W Africa 300,000 3,000 Increasing (?) 1,820 ± 1,667 10 to 5,890 7
Common redshank Central, E Europe (br)d 570,000 to 870,000 7,000 Decreasing 1,015 ± 770 65 to 3,870 0
Eurasian curlew Europe, N and W Africa 700,000 to 1,000,000 8,400 Decreasing 177 ± 105 15 to 487 0
Overall waterbirds      63,054 ± 22,241 29,630 to 109,795 31
  1. Biogeographic population data is taken from Wetlands International (2013). Waterbird population estimates (mean ± SD, range) and the number of years in which Ramsar population criteria were met are also presented. aSome migrate S in the non-breeding period. bNon-breeding range W and S Continental Europe, E Britain, NW Africa. cNon-breeding range W Europe, Mediterranean, N and W Africa. dNon-breeding range E Mediterranean, Asia Minor, Sub-Saharan Africa. eNumber of years in which Ramsar criteria 5 (waterbird species assemblage exceeded 20,000 individuals) and 6 (single species numbers exceeded the 1% flyway population threshold) were met. Internationally important populations are indicated in italics. fSingle species populations currently exceeding the 1% threshold that could be assessed as internationally important in the future. w, wintering; br, breeding; ?, uncertain.